WAR
     
"My subject is War, and the pity of War" (Wilfred Owen)

War is a state of widespread conflict between states, organizations or relatively large groups of people, which is characterized by the use of lethal violence between combatants of upon civilians. It is estimated that during the 20th Century between 167 and 188 million humans died as a result of war.

A common perception of war is a series of military campaigns between at least two opposing sides involving a dispute over sovereignty, territory, resources, religion or other issues. A war said to liberate an occupied country is sometimes characterized as a "war of liberation", while a war between internal elements of a state is a civil war.


To refute "the notion that organized human violence is biologically determined, the Seville Statement on Violence was designed. The statement was adopted by an international meeting of scientists, convened by the Spanish National Commission for UNESCO, in Seville, Spain, on 16 May 1986 and subsequently adopted by UNESCO at the twenty-fifth session of the General Conference on 16 November 1989. The statement contains five core ideas. These ideas are
:

1. "It is scientifically incorrect to say that we have inherited a tendency to make war from our animal ancestors."
2. "It is scientifically incorrect to say that war or any other violent behaviour is genetically programmed into our human nature."
3. "It is scientifically incorrect to say that in the course of human evolution there has been a selection for aggressive behaviour more than for other kinds of behaviour."
4. "It is scientifically incorrect to say that humans have a 'violent brain'."
5. "It is scientifically incorrect to say that war is caused by 'instinct' or any single motivation."

The statement concludes: "Just as 'wars begin in the minds of men', peace also begins in our minds. The same species who invented war is capable of inventing peace. The responsibility lies with each of us.

     

WE AS MAN CALL ON MAN. REMEMBER YOUR HUMANITY AND FORGET THE REST. IF YOU CAN, THE WAY TO PARADISE LIES OPEN, IF YOU CAN'T THERE IS THE RISK AHEAD OF A 'UNIVERSAL DEATH'. 'IMAGINE THE CONSEQUENCES OF A NUCLEAR ARMAGEDDON. THERE IS JUST ONE ALTERNATIVE TO PREVENT UNIVERSAL DEATH:

SAY NO!

Numerous of artists carried out this thought. Short after the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs it was said:

IF MAN SAY NOT NO, IF YOU SAY NOT NO, THEN THE LAST HUMAN BEING WILL WANDER WITH TEARED INTESTINES AND POISEND LUNGS, WITH NO ANSWERS AND LONELY UNDER THE POISEND BURNING HOT

SUN AND UNDER SHAKED STARS, LONELY AMOUNG THE ENDLESS MASS GRAVES AND THE COLD IDOLS OF THE GIGANTIC BRICKS IN THE EMPTY CITIES, THE LAST HUMAN BEING, WITHERED, INSANE, ABUSING, COMPLAINING AND HIS TERRIBLE LAMENT
WHY WILL UNHEARD DISAPPEAR IN THE STEPPE, BLOW THROUGH THE SHARP RUINS, TRICKLED AWAY IN THE RUINS OF THE CHURCHES, DASH AGAINST
HIGH BUNKERS, FELL IN POOLS OF BLOOD, UNHEARD, NO ANSWER, THE LAST CRY OF THE ANIMAL OF THE LAST ANIMAL:
MAN.


Nuclear terrorism is called as one of the greatest threats to international security. This gives reason for summits on nuclear security with the aim to ask for the security of nuclear materials and atttention to avoid such threats. The summits are dominated by making political appointments, on results obtained and to the future.

How Fragile/Stable is the Global Nuclear Order? Is the global nuclear order more stable, or alternatively more fragile, than it was at the beginning of the 21st Century?  Is the web of agreements, institutions, and actions that has constrained the spread and use of nuclear weapons be as tenuous today as the political landscape of the Middle East was in December 2010—when most intelligence agencies, investors, and experts expected the decade ahead to be more or less like the decade that had proceeded it?  Could it be as fragile as the Euro is today?

Because of the NSS's, a timeline was prepared, that provides a comprehensive overview of key events in nuclear history. It traces the long legacy of nuclear security threats and policies and puts these developments in a broader context. Events covered span a wide range of fields, including scientific developments, nuclear power, (non-)proliferation efforts and safety and security issues.

 

In the context of the third Nuclear Security Summit in 2014, there were also meetings in which integral and specific attention was given to the theme and agenda of the NSS. Internationally renowned experts took care of keynotes and there were colleges 'Nuclear Security & Diplomacy', ' Nuclear Security & Global Governance' and ' Nuclear Security & Decision Making. However, for purposes of assessment, the following should be considered:

 

10 trendlines undermining the global nuclear order

  • relentless advance of science and technology and accelerating diffusion of nuclear know-how

  • growing specter of "megaterrorism"

  • North Korea's expanding nuclear weapons program

  • Iran's success in crossing successive red lines as it develops its nuclear weapons options

  • Pakistan's ticking nuclear time bomb

  • eroding confidence in non-profileration regime

  • mounting evidence for those who believe nuclear weapons enhance their security

  • continental risk of "loose nukes"; weaponsand materials

  • potential "renaissance" in nuclear energy production

  • wildcards: failure to imagine ünknown unknowns"

 

factors stabilizing the global nuclear order

  • how many nuclear weapons states 25 years ago? How many today?

  • Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction: Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, and Russia

  • Nuclear Security Summits: Washington, Seoul, and The Hague

  • 52, 38, 25, X

  • Al Qaeda's leadership in Pakistan decimated

  • Iran: best prospects for agreement in a decade

  • resilience and adaptation of guardians of the global nuclear ordr

  • Ukraine as an example

 

 
Nuclear Security Matters

Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC (18 March 1893 – 4 November 1918) was an English poet and soldier, one of the leading poets of the First World War. His shocking, realistic war poetry on the horrors of trenches and gas warfare was heavily influenced by his friend and mentor Siegfried Sassoon, and stood in stark contrast both to the public perception of war at the time and to the confidently patriotic verse written by earlier war poets such as Rupert Brooke. Among his best-known works – most of which were published posthumously – are "Dulce et Decorum est", "Insensibility", "Anthem for Doomed Youth", "Futility" and "Strange Meeting".

DULCE ET DECORUM EST

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime.—
Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams before my helpless sight
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin,
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori.