INNOVATION
     
Hello, I'm Pepper, a humanoid robot by Aldebaran Robotics and SoftBank designed with the ability to read emotions. I was introduced in a conference on 5 June 2014, and was showcased in Softbank mobile phone stores in Japan beginning the next day. I was scheduled to be available in February 2015 at a base price of JPY 198,000 ($1,931) at Softbank Mobile stores. My emotion comes from the ability to analyze expressions and voice tones.

My head has four microphones, two HD cameras (in the mouth and forehead), and a 3-D depth sensor (behind the eyes). There is a gyroscope in my torso and touch sensors in my head and hands. My mobile base has two sonars, six lasers, three bumper sensors, and a gyroscope. I'm able to run the existing content in the app store designed for Aldebaran's other robot, Nao. I'm not a functional robot for domestic use. Instead, I'm intended "to make people happy", enhance people's lives, facilitate relationships, have fun with people and connect people with the outside world. My creators hope that independent developers will create new content and uses for me.

I'm available as a research robot for schools, colleges and universities to teach programming and conduct research into human-robot interactions. In the United Kingdom, it is available through Rapid Electronics Limited for this purpose. I'm completely designed and built to keep you company and provide you information.
I am deployed in retail and at the reception, provide a warm welcome or can be a good co-host. I speak very much to the imagination. The combination of voice and tablet offers unique innovative possibilities.

 


Innovation, the development of new customers value through solutions that meet new needs, inarticulate needs, or old customer and market needs in new ways. This is accomplished through different or more effective products, processes, services, technologies, or ideas that are readily available to markets, governments, and society. Innovation differs from invention in that innovation refers to the use of a better and, as a result, novel idea or method, whereas invention refers more directly to the creation of the idea or method itself. The 'European Innovation Scoreboard' revealed that the EU has lost one fifth of its world share in R&D since 2005. The clock is ticking as emerging economies like Brazil and China are rapidly bridging 'the innovation gap' between themselves and the EU. At the same time Europe is losing more ground to the US and Japan. As global competition intensifes and the traditional sources of advantage diminish, there is a danger of the edge becoming the core.
IMPORTANT INVENTIONS:
money
, wheel, fire, electricity, the printing press, the steam engine, tv, oil refining, democracy, internet, automobile, telephone, refrigeration, legal system, airplane, abacus, facebook, penicillin, solidarity, cotton gin, compass, multilateral cooperation, anesthesia, shipping container, blockchain, hyperloop

creating a successful innovation policy
Nanotechnologies manipulate materials by breaking them down into an 'unimaginably small scale

digital agenda for Europe
(European Commission)

Click to see the Platform

research
and
innovation

(European Commission)

science and technology
cloud computing
BBC FUTURE Innovation in science, technology and industry Creativity and innovation contribute to economic prosperity as well as to social and individual wellbeing. the regional dimension, 8 and 9 July 2009  Station Q, the quest for a quantum future
ethics
Rathenau Institute Electron shell 001 Hydrogen

energy is not obvious

To address Europe's innovation gap, a new independent community body EIT (European Institute of Innovation and Technology) was set up. Aimed is to rapidly emerge as a key driver of EU sustainable growth and competitiveness through the stimulation of world-leading innovation.



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The Digital Festival was a one-day celebration of tech, ideas and global innovation, brought to life through talks, workshops, debates and performance. Alongside politics and law-making, Brussels is also home to a vibrant tech scene. The Festival bridged the gap between policymaker and innovator, who have an immeasurable amount to offer one another. From disruptive new startups blurring the lines between reality and virtual, to Artificial Intelligence and IoT, this was the Festival where independent talent, tech startups and industry leaders shared their vision with policymakers, press and the world. An even broader spectrum of digital communities and pioneers shaping our shared digital future during an exciting expanded programme with the focus on connectivity and inclusion.
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With Michael Bloomberg, Bob Iger, Rem Koolhaas, Ion Musk, Preet Bharara, Amanda Burden, Brian Chesky, John Doerr, Mickey Drexler, Daniel Ek, Tony Hsieh, Mike Judge, Yuri Milner, Jonah Peretti, Richard Plepler, Eric Schmidt, Jeremy Stoppelman, Astro Teller, Peter Thiel, Bob Woodward, Reed Hastings, Tom Freston, Salman Khan and David Zaslav
THE AGE OF INNOVATION, CHANGING THE WORLD THROUGH IDEAS / UNEXPECTED PAIRINGS. IN DEPTH CONVERSATIONS

In the 20th anniversary of the creation of its iconic New Establishment, Vanity Fair, in association with the Aspen Institute, presented its first conference—a unique opportunity to hear from the pioneers, influencers, and disrupters who have driven the age of innovation. An intimate forum at which the titans of technology, business, and media engaged in important, exclusive conversations.

The Vanity Fair New Establishment is the ultimate arbiter of the most influential names in the worlds of technology, media, the arts, and entertainment.

The year 2014 marked not only the 20th anniversary of the New Establishment issue but also the launch of Vanity Fair’s new annual franchise: the Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit, in association with the Aspen Institute.

Unlike other conferences in Silicon Valley, the V.F. Summit is devoted to creating a dialogue around a range of subject matter—technology, media and entertainment, business, politics, and global affairs—debated by a powerful group of speakers to an equally impressive audience.

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BLOCKCHAIN, HOW IT WORKS

A blockchain is a distributed database that maintains a continuously-growing list of ordered records called blocks. Each block contains a timestamp and a link to a previous block. By design blockchains are inherently resistant to modification of the data — once recorded, the data in a block cannot be altered retroactively.

Blockchains are secure by design and an example of a distributed computing system with high byzantine fault tolerance. Decentralised consensus can therefore be achieved with a blockchain. This makes blockchains suitable for the recording of events, title, medical records and other records management activities, identity management, transaction processing and proving provenance. This offers the potential of mass disintermediation and vast repercussions for how global trade is conducted.

The first blockchain was conceptualised by Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008 and implemented the following year as a core component of the digital currency bitcoin, where it serves as the public ledger for all transactions. Through the use of a peer-to-peer network and a distributed timestamping server, a blockchain database is managed autonomously. The invention of the blockchain for bitcoin made it the first digital currency to solve the double spending problem, without the use of a trusted authority or central server. The bitcoin design has been the inspiration for other applications.

Shaping a better society through blockchain
A lot of companies, organizations and entrepreneurs in the Netherlands are already taking the first steps into the world of blockchain, but most of the applications and innovations still revolve around bitcoin, and blockchain applications seldom find their way to consumers or end users. There’s a lack of paying customers, which in turn creates a lack of startups, and because the technology is so new, the outcomes are sometimes uncertain, making it too risky for a lot of people in decision making positions.

Mission
The Dutch Blockchain Hackathon wants to bridge the gap between organizations providing cases, and the people able to come up with solutions and help create a network where larger, older organizations from both public and private sector can experiment and work together with other, younger companies and create and scale up really groundbreaking innovations. Our goal is to involve and strengthen the entire ecosystem of government, corporates, the scientific community, startups and grownups and really start accelerating Blockchain based solutions. That’s why this Hackathon is a year round innovation cycle, instead of a 54 hour weekend, to make sure everyone’s on the same page and actively involved, and great ideas to improve society can become a reality.

   
Vision
The World Economic Forum has called blockchain one of the seven potentially most world changing technologies, with possible uses ranging from healthcare, the food industry, energy, smart industry, all the way to logistics and government. This is a great opportunity for the Netherlands to be among the worldwide leaders and create new Dutch online multinationals in the process. We want to take the next step towards innovation and building a better world. By working together, we can really show the rest of the world what we’re able to do here and even turn our blockchain applications into a successful export product.
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AND HOW CAN EUROPE BE MORE INNOVATE?

Following naturally from below, CEPS in cooperation with Ernst & Young organised summits on creating a successful innovation policy. Surely, innovation is one of the cornerstones of Europe's knowledge-based economy. The EU 2020 strategy defined the 'Innovation Union' as one of the flagship initiatives that are needed to guarantuee and strengthen the EU's position in an increasingly globalized world.

The summits were a platform for discussion and the exchange of ideas between the EU and the business community on how to develop policies that will engage the business community and stimulate real and powerful innovation and entrepeneurship within the EU. Innovation is a key for the future of the EU as a competitive market, as well as for the survival of European business: Innovation Union, turning ideas into jobs, green growth and social progress. Feeling Europe participated and delivered the paper 'The Next Opportunity to Make Headway', resonance in the form of a compilation of information and to show notions and views, that keeps citizens busy. There is need of existence of a believe in progress thinking and of people with minds with special bumps. Drivers will steer direction and governance will take care that aimed goals will be achieved.

Presentation European Commission February 2011
The summit started with a keynote speech by Herman van Rompuy, President European Council. "Innovation has a lot to do with behaviour, risk taking, motivation and education. You can't have a society of very creative people only based on financial stimulus," the former Belgian premier said Wednesday (4 May) during a conference organised by Ernst&Young on innovation and the role of government in supporting it.

Van Rompuy said that "societal problems in Belgium and elsewhere" in the EU mean that people "live in a climate of despair and are depressed." But in order for Europe to remain at the cutting edge of innovation in areas ranging from energy to agriculture, services and digital technologies, "we need a dynamic and positive society," based on competition "but also on generosity." The financial and subsequent economic crises "can help," he said, noting that in the past year, EU institutions have evolved a lot. "But crisis can be very depressive. Only negative messages from leaders are the wrong message coming out of the crisis. The positive outlook is key for a dynamic society," he stressed.

Noting that according to the EU's own estimates, the bloc will fall behind Asia and the US by 2025 in terms of innovation, Van Rompuy said he will not let EU leaders hide behind nice pledges, after they agreed earlier this year to give priority to areas such as education, innovation and energy.

"We will not allow this process to become a slow bureaucratic exercise, but we will follow it closely," he said. At an upcoming EU summit mid-June, a first assessment of these policies and country-specific recommendations will be made. "Early 2012, I want to know what member states concretely did in the one year period to boost innovation, even in harsh times of austerity. What did they do to increase the share of innovative products and services in public procurement, to stimulate green growth, to prove the use of EU funding allocated to research and innovation," Van Rompuy said. After the speech, Herman Van Rompuy said that, if Europe is to remain relevant as an innovative economy, people need to be more positive and entrepreneurial and not let themselves be depressed by the economic crisis and subsequent austerity measures.

         
Logo European Patent Office
EPO (European Patent Office)

With expert, well-supported staff, motivated to set worldwide standards in quality and efficiency, EPO continue to contribute to innovation across Europe, and play a leading role in developing an effective global patent system. All our relationships - within our Office and with partners around the world - will prosper through trust, transparency, fairness and mutual respect. Our processes will empower our people to use their knowledge and skills to the full. EPO supports innovation, competitiveness and economic growth across Europe through a commitment to high quality and efficient services delivered under the European Patent Convention. The organisation is an intergovernmental organisation that was set up on 7 October 1977 on the basis of the European Patent Convention (EPC) signed in Munich in 1973. It has two bodies, the European Patent Office and the Administrative Council, which supervises the Office's activities.

Modern day inventors, the intellectual descendants of Archimedes and Alexander Graham Bell, will soon be able to obtain low cost patents, enforceable across Europe. With the assent of 480 members of the EU Parliament, in a deal brokered with the EU Council, the final hurdle towards the establishment of a EU-wide patent office was cleared 14 December 2012. "Intellectual property must not stop at the borders". Intellectual property has become a defining element of modern business practice and patents serve an ever more important task - safeguarding innovation.

At present, obtaining a patent, enforceable in all of the member states, is a bureaucratic and costly endeavour, requiring separate patents to be obtained from each member state at costs of up to EUR 36,000 according to figures quoted by the European Parliament. According to the new plans an EU patent may cost as little as EUR 4,725. Considering the international environment, where patents can be obtained in markets such as the US, Japan and China for a mere fraction of the cost, this timely package will undoubtedly assist businesses across the continent, as well as strengthening its hand in international negotiations with the world's leading economies. The new patent system will be governed by a newly established body, the European Patent Organisation (EPO), which is established outside of the EU institutions and answerable to a European Patent Court (EPC). The new system will come into force from January 2014, allowing time for the ratification process to conclude with the member state governments.

Applications for a patent under the new system must be submitted in English, German or French. Mindful of the effect such submission might have on businesses, particularly SME's operating in other national languages within the union, the EU Parliament fought to ensure that the costs involved in obtaining translations for a successful application could be reimbursed. Given that patent submissions may be given in English, the UK is unlikely to be negatively affected by the language restrictions. However, renewal fees, which often account for a significant amount of patent costs, are to be set at levels that take account of the special needs of small firms, which will ensure that low costs prevail.

Although the measure obtained today falls short of a unitary policy, with Italy and Spain choosing to stay outside the new patent it nevertheless provides a more resilient and business friendly package, certain to strengthen innovation. The vote received praise from the Conservative Group, with UK MEP Sajjad Karim, who was involved in negotiations on the new package hailing the measure as a "major advance for the intellectual-property rights of inventors" and in a firm rebuttal to euro sceptics went on to state that "Rather than eroding sovereignty, the measures guarantee that UK businesses will not have to litigate all across Europe but under a single court system which uses English as one of its main languages.
 

CEPS
: Innovation policy is increasingly coming under the spotlight in the European Union, and has been given a prominent role in the EU 2020 strategy and in the flagship initiatives that will aim to ensure that Europe succeeds where the Lisbon strategy failed.
In years to come, problems such as the fragmentation of competences at EU and member state level; the need to fill the ‘skills gap’ and address the changing nature of innovation; the absence of a Community patent and a common framework for litigation; the need to refine the EU policy on technology transfer and standardisation; and the need to provide suitable funding instruments to boost the potential of innovative companies will all take on more urgency.

The CEPS Task Force on Innovation Policy – chaired by Maria Anvret – reflected on these issues between September 2009 and May 2010. The Report, drafted by Rapporteurs Massimilano Granieri and Andrea Renda on the basis of contributions by industry representatives, officials of EU institutions, academics and practitioners provides recommendations on all the above-mentioned issues, with a view to contributing to one of the greatest challenges of today: unlocking the EU’s innovation potential and promoting its competitiveness in a global economy.

Click to read the content

CEPS presented the new approach. Representatives of the European Commission, DG Research and Innovation and DG Enterprise and Industry, of the University of Foggia, Italy and of the business (Volvo, VNO-NCW, Microsoft) cleared up and illustrated it during a meeting 18 February 2011. Governance system is complex, Entrepeneurship is at the heart of Europe 2020, but too few of them innovate, for SME's and industry strengthening the knowledge base, getting good ideas to markets and tracking progress matter as out of the box thinking and enterprising spirit and skills do.

INTRODUCTION AND MAIN RECOMMENDATIONS

The past decade saw a gradual European ‘lag’ vis-à-vis the US, Asian tigers and several emerging economies in terms of research, development and innovation (R&D&I). The 2009 European Innovation Scoreboard has shown positive signs in some regions, but overall innovative investments by businesses still appear relatively weak.
Importantly, highly dynamic sectors such as ICT (information communication technology) account for almost one half of EU productivity growth, but at the same time are also the main reason for the US-EU gap. Re-launching Europe’s ICT sector becomes even more crucial with the upcoming European Digital Agenda, which promises to contribute an estimated €500 billon, or 4% of GDP to the EU economy
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Various reasons account for Europe’s gap, certainly including the current fragmentation of the Internal Market and the absence of welldeveloped venture capital; the overly complex governance of EU funding mechanisms, coupled with the extreme fragmentation of funding tools; the red tape associated with access to public funds; the limited mobility of skilled workers throughout the EU27; the absence of legal certainty as regards patent law, technology transfer and standardisation processes; the distance between market needs and public innovation policies; and many others.

Today, nothing is more important for the re-launch of the EU project than unleashing the potential for EU competitiveness through innovation.
EU institutions endorsed this view in the recently adopted EU2020 strategy, which announces seven flagship initiatives, of which at least five are intimately linked with innovation (Innovation Union, Digital Agenda, Resource Efficient Europe, A New Industrial Policy for the new globalisation era and an Agenda for new skills and jobs)
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In the report, it is argued that Europe must take a proactive stance towards innovation policy and must do it in a way that accounts for the systemic and changing nature of innovation. The EU approach to innovation policy must be integrated and comprehensive, and should include, inter alia, education policy: the availability of skills should not be seen as limited to improving the attractiveness of Europe to highly qualified European students and researchers; on the contrary, Europe must compete internationally to attract the best skills available worldwide.

The EU approach should also be flexible, since the nature of innovation has changed enormously in the past decade and has also become sector-specific. Today, in some sectors (e.g. ICT) collaboration between market players for the development of complex system goods has become standard practice, and calls for the definition of clear rules related to the standardisation process. At the same time, in other sectors (e.g. chemicals and nanotechnology) the concept of ‘open innovation’ is permeating new business models, blurring the boundaries between individual firms’ R&D efforts and leading to a blossoming new era of collaboration.

The panel of discussants, chaired by Staffan Jerneck (CEPS), featured Maria Anvret (Task Force Chair, Gothenburg University), Ann-Sofie Rönnlund (DG Research and Innovation), Katja Reppel (DG Enterprise and Industry), Massimiliano Granieri (Rapporteur, University of Foggia), Andrea Renda (Rapporteur, CEPS), Lars-Goran Rosengren (Volvo AB) and Joke Van den Bandt (VNO-NCW). CEPS continues the debate on the role of innovation policy for a EU digital single market in its Digital Forum (www.digitalforum.eu), which meets next on March 18th, to debate the findings of the CEPS Task Force Report on Critical Infrastructure Protection in the EU.

Download the report at http://bit.ly/hglhFE

 

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One of the breakout sessions during the World Foresight Forum was called 'Technology for innovative solutions' and did fit within the topic 'Science & Technology'. In only half an hour a small group of participants designed a model from out zero in order to be able to innovate, to steer innovation and to conditions that can come to break-throughs. During inventive discussions and argumentations it appeared that there was plenty of enthusiasm, motivation, insight and response to lay down notions for a (complex) model.

'Technology, the tool for humand kind, 'can solve anything'. We need inventors, talent, high education, smart skilled people, call it an 'engeneer society'. Research is required. Around us, there are numberless phenomenia, which will steer a further cause of things: banking processes are lacking, population growth, demands for rescouces, political will influence the process. We also need to use more our human spiritual capacities and organs of senses, such as imagination, creativity, to be able to exchange, to build, connect, discuss, see, hear, learn and to handle multidiscipline way of thinking. Parts from social and moral fields should also be bound up within innovation-processes.

Not only effects on behaviour came also up for discussion (suggested was to adapt behaviour before new things will occur), but also to take innovation up in business-models and to focus on small regions. However, there are also difficult sides. Opposite vested interests (oil, labour, etc.) can create obstacles, by which implementation will be hampered. Suggested was to integrate feed back loops (self and to others). In this connection, also insecurity (e.g. concerning ict - cyberattack) was discussed. Smart usage to change and to achieve the aimed sustainable result, is therefore a need, including a deep and common integration of innovation, including communication on the matter and culture awareness.

Some present drivers, which will trigger innovation, are internet (cloud computing) and the internet of things, 'cities hub' (economic growth, plan, cleaner (low emissions) and safer), quantity of raw materials, healthcare (innovation can achieve both same level and lower costs) and availability of and access to money